Start a Computer Business with the Computer Business Kit

Author Topic: Microsoft goes public with plans for its new Windows 8 file system - ReFS  (Read 2396 times)

Offline airtech

  • Tier 3 Member
  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 866
    • AirTech Solutions
« Last Edit: January 18, 2012, 02:36:14 AM by airtech »

Offline Todd Hughes

  • Beer is like porn: You can buy it but it's more fun to make your own.
  • Global Moderator
  • Guru
  • *****
  • Posts: 9933
Yay, another new proprietary file system from MS. Think they'll at least make it backwards-compatible with their older OS's and apps?
Quote from: Parrish
Damn you Microsoft! Damn you to hell!!

Microsoft you SUCK!

F.U. Microsoft!!!!#@@#$@#$@#@#!@#%^&%$^

Offline RoboGeek

  • Gising na!!
  • Tier 3 Member
  • Guru
  • ****
  • Posts: 8418
is anyone doing developer testing on the server? I've only doing it for the client - still NTFS

This is gonna be fun for  data recoveries
Artificial Intelligence is no match for Natural Stupidity

Offline Parrish

  • Tier 3 Member
  • Mentor
  • ****
  • Posts: 18183
    • Pathfinder Networks
I have to wonder- is this what WinFS turned in to or did they just completely give up on that years ago to start from scratch?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ReFS#ReFS_file_system
Quote
ReFS file system
 
ReFS (Resilient File System) is a new file system initially intended for file servers that succeeds NTFS in Windows Server 8. Major new features of ReFS include: [20]
 Reliable on-disk structures ReFS uses B+ trees for all on-disk structures including metadata and file data, which allows infinite scalability and removes many limits on file and directory size. In particular, file size, total volume size, number of files in a directory and number of directories in a volume are limited by 64-bit numbers, which translates to maximum file size of 16 Exbibytes and maximum volume size of 1 Yobibyte (with 64 KB clusters). Metadata and file data are organized into tables similar to relational database. Free space is counted by a hierarchial allocator which includes three separate tables for large, medium, and small chunks. File name and file path are each limited to a 32 KB Unicode text string. Built-in resiliency ReFS employs a robust allocation-on-write update strategy for metadata, which allocates new chunks for every update transaction and uses large IO batches. All ReFS metadata has built-in 64-bit checksums which are stored independently. The file data can have an optional checksum in a separate "integrity stream", in which case the file update strategy also implements allocation-on-write; this is controlled by a new "integrity" attribute applicable to both files and directories. If nevertheless file data or metadata becomes corrupt, the file can be deleted without taking down the whole volume offline for maintenance, then restored from the backup. As a result of built-in resiliency, administrators do not need to periodically run error-checking tools such as CHKDSK anymore. Compatible with existing APIs and technologies ReFS does not require new system APIs and most file system filters continue to work with ReFS volumes. ReFS seamlessly supports many existing Windows and NTFS features such as BitLocker encryption, Access Control Lists, USN Journal, change notifications,[21] symbolic links, junction points, mount points, reparse points, volume snapshots, file IDs, and oplock. ReFS seamlessly integrates with Storage Spaces, a storage virtualization layer that allows data mirroring and striping, as well as sharing storage pools between machines.[22] ReFS resiliency features enhance the mirroring feature provided by Storage Spaces and can detect whether any mirrored copies of files become corrupt using background data scrubbing process, which periodically reads all mirror copies and verifies their checksums then replaces bad copies with good ones.
Some NTFS features are not supported in ReFS, including named streams, object IDs, short names, file compression, file level encryption (EFS), user data transactions, sparse files, hard links, extended attributes, and disk quotas.[20][23] Dynamic disks with mirrored or striped volumes are replaced with mirrored or striped storage pools provided by Storage Spaces, however in Windows 8 Server, automated error-correction is only supported on mirrored spaces, and booting from ReFS is not supported either.
2013 Parrish Reinoehl

Quote from: Todd Hughes
Linux guys are a strange lot...........

Offline Mark Verhyden

  • Tier 3 Member
  • Macgyvertech
  • ****
  • Posts: 2740
I fairly sure it is the new name for WinFS and what ever other names they called it.  I remember back when they started pumping up Server 08.  First they said it would have it then they pulled the plug because it was not ready.

This has been going on since 2003.  So I truly doubt that ResFS is something totally new.  It is inconceivable that M$ could dream up something totally new and make it reliable in just 3 years.  Especially something as important as a file system.

Offline Parrish

  • Tier 3 Member
  • Mentor
  • ****
  • Posts: 18183
    • Pathfinder Networks
ReFS can support drives up to 1 yobibyte in size.  A yobibyte is 1,099,511,627,776 terabytes.  That is over 1 trillion terabytes.  Holy crap. 
2013 Parrish Reinoehl

Quote from: Todd Hughes
Linux guys are a strange lot...........

Offline AlMichaels

  • Tier 3 Member
  • Macgyvertech
  • ****
  • Posts: 1267
ReFS can support drives up to 1 yobibyte in size.  A yobibyte is 1,099,511,627,776 terabytes.  That is over 1 trillion terabytes.  Holy crap.

thats when your whole office wall becomes a server farm   :biggrin:
Al Michaels
www.nettechservicesofohio.com
"Dont forget, Hire a Vet"

Offline RoboGeek

  • Gising na!!
  • Tier 3 Member
  • Guru
  • ****
  • Posts: 8418
so you could have the entire internet on your PC.. lol
Artificial Intelligence is no match for Natural Stupidity

Offline Todd Hughes

  • Beer is like porn: You can buy it but it's more fun to make your own.
  • Global Moderator
  • Guru
  • *****
  • Posts: 9933
ReFS can support drives up to 1 yobibyte in size.  A yobibyte is 1,099,511,627,776 terabytes.  That is over 1 trillion terabytes.  Holy crap.

So what! My new file system BeERFS can support drives up to 1 gazilajobilabytes. A gazilajobilabytes is 1,099,511,627,776 yobibytes. Just like M$'s system, it will likely be years before you see it and it really doesn't matter because no one can afford a new 1.5 yobibyte hard drive anyway.  :p
Quote from: Parrish
Damn you Microsoft! Damn you to hell!!

Microsoft you SUCK!

F.U. Microsoft!!!!#@@#$@#$@#@#!@#%^&%$^

Offline RoboGeek

  • Gising na!!
  • Tier 3 Member
  • Guru
  • ****
  • Posts: 8418
Ha!! thats nothing! My RoB0FS doesn't even need bytes - its stores everything in another dimension with unlimited storage and speed of light access!!
Artificial Intelligence is no match for Natural Stupidity

Offline Parrish

  • Tier 3 Member
  • Mentor
  • ****
  • Posts: 18183
    • Pathfinder Networks
Re: Microsoft goes public with plans for its new Windows 8 file system - ReFS
« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2012, 10:33:22 PM »
so you could have the entire internet on your PC.. lol
No kidding.  I have to seriously wonder- if you took all the data being stored worldwide at this point would it even come close to a yobibyte?  I have a feeling no. 
Another way to look at it- a yobibyte is 1billion petabytes.  I don't believe there is 1billion petabytes of data being stored worldwide at this point but I could be wrong.
2013 Parrish Reinoehl

Quote from: Todd Hughes
Linux guys are a strange lot...........

Offline Todd Hughes

  • Beer is like porn: You can buy it but it's more fun to make your own.
  • Global Moderator
  • Guru
  • *****
  • Posts: 9933
Re: Microsoft goes public with plans for its new Windows 8 file system - ReFS
« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2012, 10:40:13 PM »
so you could have the entire internet on your PC.. lol
No kidding.  I have to seriously wonder- if you took all the data being stored worldwide at this point would it even come close to a yobibyte?  I have a feeling no. 
Another way to look at it- a yobibyte is 1billion petabytes.  I don't believe there is 1billion petabytes of data being stored worldwide at this point but I could be wrong.

It's possible, think about research labs (DNA sequencing, theoretical physics, etc).
Quote from: Parrish
Damn you Microsoft! Damn you to hell!!

Microsoft you SUCK!

F.U. Microsoft!!!!#@@#$@#$@#@#!@#%^&%$^

Offline Parrish

  • Tier 3 Member
  • Mentor
  • ****
  • Posts: 18183
    • Pathfinder Networks
Re: Microsoft goes public with plans for its new Windows 8 file system - ReFS
« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2012, 10:45:49 PM »
ReFS can support drives up to 1 yobibyte in size.  A yobibyte is 1,099,511,627,776 terabytes.  That is over 1 trillion terabytes.  Holy crap.

So what! My new file system BeERFS can support drives up to 1 gazilajobilabytes. A gazilajobilabytes is 1,099,511,627,776 yobibytes. Just like M$'s system, it will likely be years before you see it and it really doesn't matter because no one can afford a new 1.5 yobibyte hard drive anyway.  :p
At this point in time the yobibyte (or rather yottabyte depending on perspective but both are the same size) is the largest unit of measure in the binary system.  It came into existence back in 2005.  No idea what the next level after that will be but I do know it will be a number which is equivilant to the size of 10 to the 27th power.  The yobibyte is 10 to the 24th power.  Each successive size is an addtional 3 power from the previous.  Starting with kilobyte which is 10 to the 3rd power. 
Those figures are based on the International System of Units (or rather metric system) but, in reality, those are not 100% correct as the actual sizes are 10 to whatever power times a factor- such as 1.024 for KB, 1.049 for MB, 1.074 for GB, 1.1 for TB, 1.126 for PB, and so on.
Those factors come from the IEC. 
The odd thing about all that is that we use the SI naming system for all the sizes but use the IEC math for the actual sizes.  Not sure why that is.

This is what I'm referring to from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilobyte
2013 Parrish Reinoehl

Quote from: Todd Hughes
Linux guys are a strange lot...........

Offline Parrish

  • Tier 3 Member
  • Mentor
  • ****
  • Posts: 18183
    • Pathfinder Networks
Re: Microsoft goes public with plans for its new Windows 8 file system - ReFS
« Reply #13 on: January 20, 2012, 10:47:36 PM »
so you could have the entire internet on your PC.. lol
No kidding.  I have to seriously wonder- if you took all the data being stored worldwide at this point would it even come close to a yobibyte?  I have a feeling no. 
Another way to look at it- a yobibyte is 1billion petabytes.  I don't believe there is 1billion petabytes of data being stored worldwide at this point but I could be wrong.

It's possible, think about research labs (DNA sequencing, theoretical physics, etc).
Good point.  I should ask my godson if he knows how much data was being store at LANL.  That would be a good indicator of worldwide storage as they probably house the largest amount of data in our country. 
Still, I would bet it's not much more than a yobibyte total.  Now, in a month, it might be double that..  :laugh:
Well, on second though, Megaupload was just shut down so that had to knock out quite a lot of data. 
2013 Parrish Reinoehl

Quote from: Todd Hughes
Linux guys are a strange lot...........

Offline Parrish

  • Tier 3 Member
  • Mentor
  • ****
  • Posts: 18183
    • Pathfinder Networks
Re: Microsoft goes public with plans for its new Windows 8 file system - ReFS
« Reply #14 on: January 20, 2012, 10:50:27 PM »
If this article is even remotely accurate it states that world wide data storage in 2007 was around 295 exabytes.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-12419672
It takes 1 million exabytes to hit 1 yobibyte.

So, I still would have to believe we haven't hit the 1 yobibyte mark yet.  I'm sure world wide data has grown a huge amount since 2007- but even if it grew by 10 fold that would still be a far cry from a yobibyte.  Heck, even if it grew a hundred fold since then it would still around 1/3 a yobibyte.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2012, 10:53:28 PM by Parrish »
2013 Parrish Reinoehl

Quote from: Todd Hughes
Linux guys are a strange lot...........