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Author Topic: high speed rail  (Read 4231 times)

Offline Ward

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Re: high speed rail
« Reply #15 on: July 16, 2013, 10:29:00 AM »
I would think 400 mph would be good enough. And safer.

Offline Nathan Williams

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Re: high speed rail
« Reply #16 on: July 16, 2013, 10:32:44 AM »
That would make it no better then an airplane flight.  What's the point?

Offline Arctic

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Re: high speed rail
« Reply #17 on: July 16, 2013, 10:46:49 AM »
What is the G load on the passengers?
The body cant take more than a few G's constant before people will up and die.
They can take sustained G's for only a very very short period of time.

A top fuel dragster goes from 0 to 100mph in .86 seconds giving you a G load of around 5.4 g.

Human tolerances depend on the magnitude of the g-force, the length of time it is applied, the direction it acts, the location of application, and the posture of the body.
A hard slap on the face may briefly impose hundreds of g locally but not produce any real damage; a constant 16g for a minute, however, may be deadly.



Offline Ward

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Re: high speed rail
« Reply #18 on: July 16, 2013, 11:03:41 AM »
That would make it no better then an airplane flight.  What's the point?
Well, they said the cost would be $100 on this one. So, if it was $100 or so on this, it is much cheaper.

Offline Ward

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Re: high speed rail
« Reply #19 on: July 16, 2013, 11:05:25 AM »
What is the G load on the passengers?
The body cant take more than a few G's constant before people will up and die.
They can take sustained G's for only a very very short period of time.

A top fuel dragster goes from 0 to 100mph in .86 seconds giving you a G load of around 5.4 g.

Human tolerances depend on the magnitude of the g-force, the length of time it is applied, the direction it acts, the location of application, and the posture of the body.
A hard slap on the face may briefly impose hundreds of g locally but not produce any real damage; a constant 16g for a minute, however, may be deadly.
I think it would not take off that fast. it would have to take a bit to get there and to slow down as well. 

Offline slowhand53

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Re: high speed rail
« Reply #20 on: July 16, 2013, 11:11:00 AM »
Sonic booms aren't acceptable from aircraft why would it be permitted from a rail train?
They are not an option. Break the sound barrier it happens. This is well beyond Mach 1

Yes I know that.   You misunderstand.  Airplanes are prohibited from travelling faster then Mach 1 inside the Continental US to prevent Sonic Booms.   I was asking why a train would be legally permitted to  break that law.  I had not read the article yet did not realize (and the drawing is inaccurate) that the train would function inside of a tube.
apparently the air national guard doesn't pay attention to that rule.  living on the jersey shore in the 90's, i heard quite a few booms from the weekend drill crews.

Offline eroccia

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Re: high speed rail
« Reply #21 on: July 16, 2013, 11:40:27 AM »
Sonic booms aren't acceptable from aircraft why would it be permitted from a rail train?
They are not an option. Break the sound barrier it happens. This is well beyond Mach 1

Yes I know that.   You misunderstand.  Airplanes are prohibited from travelling faster then Mach 1 inside the Continental US to prevent Sonic Booms.   I was asking why a train would be legally permitted to  break that law.  I had not read the article yet did not realize (and the drawing is inaccurate) that the train would function inside of a tube.
apparently the air national guard doesn't pay attention to that rule.  living on the jersey shore in the 90's, i heard quite a few booms from the weekend drill crews.

I remember that when we would be down in Ocean City

Offline witchdoctor

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Re: high speed rail
« Reply #22 on: July 16, 2013, 12:07:23 PM »
The military is exempt from the mach 1 rule in most areas.

They wouldn't need anything like a perfect vacuum to significantly reduce friction and dampen any sonic boom.

"Astronomical" would be a good word to describe a small portion of the cost, and at least a decade to acquire the land rights.